Destinations


With its just 5,7 million inhabitants, Denmark is a small country, but it offers numerous experiences for almost any type of traveler. A wide variety of landscapes and areas of natural beauty, combined with modern, culturally vibrant and green cities, makes Denmark a country with enough experiences to keep coming back. In Denmark, the water is always close by, giving the cities attractive, recreational areas and supplying the countryside with both rugged coastline and sandy beaches. The Danes themselves are a happy people – in fact, we are consistently surveyed as being the world’s happiest! Denmark is wealthy and safe, and Danes enjoy a high standard of living with a good work-life balance. Maybe because of this, we are able to ‘hygge’ – our word for enjoying a cozy time with friends or family - and maintain an easygoing lifestyle.

For lovers of food, Denmark has become a gastronomic hub. Over the past decade, we have undergone a revolution, and received international attention for our New Nordic Cuisine. Noma, repeatedly winning the title of world’s best restaurant, has indeed paved the way for this new approach, which uses locally sourced, seasonal ingredients and preparing them in new and innovative ways. As the culinary bar has been raised, eating on a budget can easily become a culinary experience as well. One example is the traditional Danish lunch, “smørrebrød”, an open-faced, richly garnished dark rye bread, which has seen a revival and is now enjoyed across all generations.

Denmark also offers a rich history, which can be experienced all around - from our impressive castles to the historical buildings and monuments, of which many are still in use, to our UNESCO World Heritage Sites ranging from 65 million year old natural wonders to the home of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. We are perhaps most well known for our early history. The Vikings reconfigured European society in the 8th to 11th centuries. Their history and skillful shipbuilding can be studied and experienced at the Viking Ship Museum in the town of Roskilde, a 40-minute trip away from Copenhagen. Another highlight from this time period is the remarkable Jelling Stones, thought of as Denmark’s “birth certificate”. The two massive, carved runestones from the 10th century declare the unification and Christianization of Denmark, and can be visited for free in Jelling, in South Jutland.

Below you will find some of the most interesting places to visit:


Copenhagen

Copenhagen

Copenhagen is the capital of Denmark with over 1 million citizens. Before Copenhagen became the capital of Denmark, it was a small fishing area right where the city center is now. The word is derived from the words buy and harbor, so this was always a place of trading. Being the home of the world’s largest shipping company, Maersk (in Danish Mærsk), you could say, that this is still the case. Copenhagen is located in the very eastern part of Denmark on the island of Zealand. Many years ago, when parts of today’s Sweden were Danish, Copenhagen was not just the cultural and political centre of Denmark, but also the geographical center.


Aarhus

Aarhus

Aarhus is the second biggest city in Denmark with around 273.000 citizens. It is located in Jutland. Aarhus is where the Her Majesty Queen Margrethe II has her summer residence, Marselisborg Palace. The royal garden at Marselisborg Palace is open for everyone to come see, whenever the royal family isn’t there.


Odense

Odense

Odense is the largest city on Funen and the third largest city in Denmark. Funen is an island in the middle of Denmark connecting with two bridges either way. The famous author H.C. Andersen who wrote the fairytales The Ugly Duckling and the Little Mermaid was born and raised in Odense. It is possible to visit his childhood home.


Aalborg

Aalborg

Aalborg is the fourth largest city in Denmark with around 114.000 citizens. Aalborg was founded in the viking age, but there have been living people there long before it became a town. Aalborg is home to the museum of art called “Kunsten” and Aalborg University.


Bornholm

Bornholm

Bornholm, also called the Island of Sunshine, is an island in the Baltic Sea and the easternmost part of Denmark. Bornholm has an area of 588 km² and is home to about 40.000 citizens. The only way you can get to Bornholm is by plane or boat.

Bornholm is known for its smoked herrings and its round churches, that was built around 1100-1200. Bornholm is a beautiful island, with a landscape, that looks different than that of the rest of the country. The rocky underground of Bornholm is found nowhere else in Denmark. Here are also forests, hills and sandy beaches as well as adorable villages. The castle ruins of Hammershus are also worth a visit.


Skagen

Skagen

Skagen is Denmark’s northernmost town and a popular holiday destination. Skagen is loved by many Danes, who are attracted to the broad, white, sandy beaches, impressive sand dunes and historical landmarks. On top of this, Skagen has the most hours of sunshine a year in Denmark. Bird watchers also flock to Skagen where they can observe the most bird species in the country. Being the country’s largest fishing port, the town has a deep-rooted fishing culture which is still alive and well, and can be experienced in everything from delicious fish and seafood restaurants to the lively marina, to the artistic interpretations in the town’s many museums.


Ærø

Ærø

Ærø is perhaps Denmark’s most idyllic island. With around 6000 inhabitants, it is connected only by ferry. Located in the Baltic Sea, the island is one of the 55 islands and islets that make up the unique, natural area known as the South Funen archipelago. The beautiful countryside is characterized by gentle, sloping hills, green cornfields and marshland, and a rich flora and wildlife. With its low car traffic, it is a popular destination for hiking and cycling. Ærø also has a number of picture-perfect old towns, rich with history and well-preserved buildings. Along with the many kilometers of sandy beaches, and a wide variety of locally sourced culinary experiences Ærø is one of Denmark’s prime island destinations.


Samsoe

Samsoe

Samsoe is an island in Kattegat with around 3.700 citizens. Samsoe is known for three things: its delicious potatoes, the Samsoe Festival, which is held every summer and for being the worlds only self-sufficient island with regards to energy. It is only connected to the rest of Denmark by boat. It’s a wonderful place to visit, even if it’s just a small stop on the way between Copenhagen and Aarhus.